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Event - October 2013

Video: The New Face of New York’s Seniors Forum

On October 15, 2013, the Center for an Urban Future held a conference on planning for New York City's rapidly aging immigrant population. With 430,000 foreign born residents over the age of 65, New York has by far the largest immigrant senior population of any U.S. city. This symposium delved into how New York should plan for the aging of its immigrant population, with panelists sharing solutions they have implemented to serve older immigrants. It also fleshed out what strategies government agencies, nonprofit organizations and immigrant leaders can develop to ensure that New York is not only a great place for immigrants but also a great place for immigrants to grow old.

Tags: aging immigrants boroughs

In the years ahead, few demographic trends will have a greater impact on New York City than the aging of the population. The number of city residents 65 and older is expected to increase by 35 percent over the next two decades. But within this larger demographic trend is an important but little noticed development: immigrants now make up nearly half of the city's senior population and are driving all of its growth. Indeed, over the last decade the foreign born senior population grew by 30 percent while the native born senior population declined by 9 percent. With 430,000 foreign born residents over the age of 65, New York has by far the largest immigrant senior population of any U.S. city.

This symposium examined the implications of these trends on New York and discussed the specific challenges facing the city's immigrant seniors, who tend to be significantly poorer and less likely to receive a range of government benefits than their native-born counterparts. The forum delved into how New York should plan for the aging of its immigrant population, with panelists sharing solutions they have implemented to serve older immigrants. It also fleshed out what strategies government agencies, nonprofit organizations and immigrant leaders can develop to ensure that New York is not only a great place for immigrants but also a great place for immigrants to grow old.

#nycseniors     @nycfuture

8:30am – 8:35am: Welcoming Remarks

  • Gifford Miller, Board Chairman, Center for an Urban Future

 

 

8:35am – 8:45am: Presentation of The New Face of New York’s Seniors Report

  • Jonathan Bowles, Executive Director, Center for an Urban Future
  • Christian González-Rivera, Research Associate, Center for an Urban Future

 

 

8:45am – 10:30am: Panel: Planning for New York City’s Rapidly Aging Immigrant Population

  • Moderator: Jonathan Bowles, Executive Director, Center for an Urban Future
  • Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, Commissioner, New York City Dept. for the Aging
  • Dr. Ruth Finkelstein, Senior Vice-President for Policy & Planning, New York Academy of Medicine; Director, Age-friendly New York City
  • Dr. Dmitri Daniel Glinski, President & CEO, Russian-Speaking Community Council of Manhattan & the Bronx
  • Irma E. Rodriguez, Executive Director, Queens Community House
  • Kyung B. Yoon, Executive Director, Korean American Community Foundation

 

 

This conference has been generously sponsored by Blanche T. Enders Trust.