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Report - June 2018

A New Leaf: Revitalizing New York City’s Aging Parks Infrastructure

New York City's public parks are busier than ever. But the combination of advanced age and decades of insufficient maintenance means that parks across all five boroughs are facing serious infrastructure challenges.

Report - June 2018

State of Work: The Coming Impact of Automation on New York

Millions of jobs in New York State will feel the effects of automation in the coming decades. These jobs are not necessarily disappearing, but they are transforming, as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and advanced robotics tackle more roles in the workplace. Policymakers should act now to help New Yorkers prepare for the changes that are coming to the world of work.

Report - June 2018

New York City’s Libraries Still Face Daunting Capital Needs

New York City is making progress in strengthening the condition of its branch libraries, but the latest capital needs figures reveal that there is still much more work to be done. The mayor and the City Council should continue what they've started and fully fund the city's three library systems to bring their aging infrastructure to a state of good repair.

Report - May 2018

Destination New York

Over the past two decades, tourism to New York City has swelled from 33 million to nearly 63 million annual visitors, with powerful ripples throughout the city’s economy. Once just one sector among many, tourism has risen to become one of the top four employment drivers in the city. But the city needs to plan ahead to sustain the current level of tourism and the jobs it has created.

Report - May 2018

New York By Design

As NYCxDESIGN kicks off, new data shows New York City leading the way in architecture and design jobs. One in two of the architecture and design jobs gained nationwide is in the five boroughs.

Report - April 2018

Keeping New York’s For-Profit Colleges on Track

Far too many graduates of New York State’s for-profit colleges end up stuck in low-wage jobs and saddled with debt that they can't afford. The State Legislature and Governor Cuomo have the power to change this by implementing statewide standards to ensure that crucial investments in higher education result in real economic gains for all students.

Report - March 2018

Opportunity Knocks: Boosting State Investment in New York’s Workforce Development System

Governor Cuomo has proposed to invest $175 million in workforce training initiatives. It is vital that policymakers fully support this new statewide investment, and to ensure that these investments are as far-reaching and effective as possible, the study proposes including an increase in resources for adult basic education, ramped-up bridge programs, and accountability through better data.

Report - January 2018

An Unhealthy Commute: The Transit Challenges Facing New York City’s Healthcare Sector

Subway and bus service in the four boroughs outside Manhattan has not kept pace with massive increases in the number of healthcare employees living and working there. By partnering with hospitals and other health providers, New York City can develop solutions befitting the city’s world-class healthcare system and ensure that this critical source of employment and opportunity can continue to grow.

Report - January 2018

Work to Do: How Automation Will Transform Jobs in NYC

In a first-of-its-kind analysis, CUF studied the automation potential of every occupation in New York City, evaluating the likelihood that a machine could perform each job’s component tasks and revealing which ones are most likely to be done by machines in the decades to come.

Report - December 2017

State of the Chains, 2017

Our 10th annual ranking of national retailers in New York City shows that the number of chain store locations across the city increased for the ninth year in a row, but fewer chains have expanded this year than in the past.

Report - December 2017

Struggling to the Finish Line: Community College Completion in New York State

While a college credential has become the single most important platform for the middle class today, only one in four New York State residents who enroll in the state’s community colleges end up earning a degree.

Report - December 2017

Degrees of Difficulty: Boosting College Success in New York City

New York City has a college success problem. Today, far too few New Yorkers who graduate high school are succeeding in college, with serious consequences for their economic mobility. To lift more of its residents into the middle class, the city will need to make dramatic improvements to its college completion rates.

Report - October 2017

Making the Connection: Aligning Small Businesses and the Workforce Development System

Small businesses have been sparking much of the recent job growth in New York City. However, there is a major disconnect in the city's workforce development system when it comes to working with small businesses. This report explores how to achieve greater alignment between the city’s thousands of small businesses and the workforce development system.

Report - July 2017

Freight Forward: Boosting NYC’s Sagging Air Cargo Sector Should be Part of NYC’s Good Jobs Strategy

With global trade again on the rise, nearly every major airport in the country is experiencing increases in air cargo volumes. But New York’s dominant air cargo hub, JFK International Airport, is trending in the opposite direction.

Report - July 2017

Artists in Schools: A Creative Solution to New York’s Affordable Space Crunch

Despite fears that New York City is no longer welcoming to artists, there are more artists living here now than ever before, and the share of artists has increased in the majority of the city's neighborhoods. Yet the same forces that have led artists to spread across the five boroughs have made it harder for them to find work spaces. The arts facilities available in local schools, many concentrated in the same neighborhoods as artists, offer one possible solution to the affordable space crunch.

Report - May 2017

The Aging Apple: Older Immigrants a Rising Share of New York’s Seniors

The growth in New York’s older immigrant population is far outpacing that of the U.S. born senior population. There are now more people over the age of 65 in the city than there are children ages 10 and younger. And for the first time since the end of World War II, the share of older New Yorkers who were born outside of the U.S. reached 49.5 percent—nearly equal to the native-born share.

Report - April 2017

More Time in the Stacks: Library Hours in NYC Still Lag Behind Other Big Cities

CUF's third annual assessment of library hours compares New York City’s public libraries with library systems in the nation’s ten largest cities and New York State’s ten largest counties. Although New York City’s branch libraries are now open significantly more hours per week than at any point in the past decade, NYC's libraries are still open fewer hours than most of the largest library systems in the nation and large New York State counties.

Report - April 2017

Slow Build

This report finds significant problems with NYC’s process for managing capital construction projects for libraries and cultural institutions, with the median capital project taking more than four years and costing roughly twice as much as a new office building. The study, a collaboration between CUF and the Citizens Budget Commission, puts forth recommendations for creating a more cost-efficient capital construction process for libraries, cultural groups and other nonprofit organizations.

Report - March 2017

In Good Health: The Growth Potential of New York City’s Digital Health Sector

The digital health sector has emerged as one of the fastest growing parts of New York City’s tech ecosystem—and an increasingly important generator of well-paying jobs. Today, New York is the nation’s second-largest center for digital health innovation, behind only Silicon Valley.

Report - December 2016

The New Normal: Supporting Nontraditional Students on the Path to a Degree

The population of nontraditional students is growing—including part-time students, older students, and students with work and family responsibilities—but New York has been slow to develop policies and programs that can help these students succeed.

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